Home » Survey of the School Plants of Rural Warren County, Kentucky by Mattie Louise Hatcher
Survey of the School Plants of Rural Warren County, Kentucky Mattie Louise Hatcher

Survey of the School Plants of Rural Warren County, Kentucky

Mattie Louise Hatcher

Published September 27th 2015
ISBN : 9781331426639
Paperback
86 pages
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Excerpt from Survey of the School Plants of Rural Warren County, KentuckyOne is confronted on every side with this question, Why do our young people in the rural districts leave their old homes and hurry into the already congested cities? ThatMoreExcerpt from Survey of the School Plants of Rural Warren County, KentuckyOne is confronted on every side with this question, Why do our young people in the rural districts leave their old homes and hurry into the already congested cities? That this state of affairs in imperiling our economic stability and indirectly our body politic, there can be no doubt. Thinkers of all classes, and especially our economists, are urging youth to stay on the farm. To which youth replies, There is no money in it. It is unattractive. It does not satisfy my love of adventure.Kentucky, being an agricultural state, has assumed her share of this national industrial problem, and among other agencies for help, created the state normal schools, a large part of whose duty is to satisfy this rural need. They are to train teachers who will in their turn lead the boys and girls of the state to see that the properly administered farm is a paying proposition which will lead them to make their own communities attractive- to inspire them into worthy adventures near home- and thus lead to a development of the great hidden material and spiritual resources of the state.An investigation of the office records of the Western Kentucky State Normal School at Bowling Green reveals these facts:(1) The great majority of short course students go into the rural schools as teachers- (2) The life-certificate graduates go into graded schools of towns and cities- (a) Ninety per cent of these life-certificate students have come up through the rural schools- (b) Only about eleven per cent of them go back to the rural school. Thus, the children of the country districts are denied contact with those teachers who are most thoroughly equipped to deal with their problems.Conferences with members of senior classes in the Western Kentucky State Normal reveal these facts- Life-certificate students do not return to rural schools because of (1) small pay, (2) fewer social advantages, (3) unattractive school conditions.The above brings up the entire question as to the condition of our rural schools. The pay is a matter for state action- social advantages will come as communities are built up educationally and economically- but the third point, unattractiveness of school conditions, is one that each community must look after for itself. There is no use in demanding a first class teacher and then giving her a barn in which to teach. There is 110 justification in expecting every teacher to be inspired with so high and holy a missionary purpose that she will continually, year after year.About the PublisherForgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.comThis book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully- any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.